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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
in detroit, protecting the pensions of people attacked by a financial manager. they were affected by the changes of what took place in detroit. they've been spending a lot of time trying to straighten that out. >> a reminder 50 years ago this was a march for jobs and freedom, organized largely by a. phillip randolph, the great labor leader and the issue of union rights, labor rights, workers rights has always been deeply interconnected with civil rights in this country. >> there's no question about it. the unions are a little nervous as this continuing attack on collective bargaining, continual attack and the introduction of legislation in right to work states, this is being introduced. local elections are taking ahold and attacking workers and depressing wages. this is a big part of what afsme has been focusing on. they're at the pinnacle of the fight right now of what's going on in michigan. >> it's almost impossible to imagine how we can talk about closing a racial inequality gap without also talking at the exact same time about the economic equality that is so critical in our
elements. if you look at his speeches from birmingham, wrik wrigly field, cleveland, chicago, detroit, i have a dream and the march on washington is really a culminationef a series of interracial fest valz that summer in which all the elements, many from letters from a birmingham jail-- are reshuffled. when you see the continuities of "i have a dream" even the drea dream-- and king always believed before there was an american dream-- he used to preach this all the time it's slaves had their own dreams. and keep in mind here, doesn't end with the declaration. it's a black man. black slaefs have the last word when he has whites become blacks so we can all experience bondage and deliverance. always conflicted when you look at king's brilliant mixing to miss these other strains of black pride and rebeaut of america. one day, the national will live out, not now. >> rose: clawrns, how did he end up being the last speaker? >> there was a proposal, 10 speers, and each speaker would be allocated five minute. and the proposal was dr. king would be in the middle, that he would be like the fifth or
't have to look any more at greece and portugal. we can look close by at detroit . folks, that is a picture of where liberal progressive ideas go. detroit was america's premier city. highest per capita income in the country. proud of our country and the auto business there. but then as you had government unions grow and higher taxes, and more regulation, as you saw these liberal progressive ideas that were supposed to help the poor and build a middle class, what have we been left with in detroit? for minorities and the poor? unemployment, about 40%. has it helped children get a better education? only 7% of children in the eighth grade read at the grade level. has it created the prosperity that they talk about when a third of the buildings are empty, where you've got 400ly quor stores and until a few weeks ago not one chain super market in what was america's premier city. folks, it's not a theatrical argument any more. and the states of california and illinois and other states following that policy are not far behind in some form of bankruptcy. our ideas are being show cas
: and it's a dream that still lives on 50 years later. edith drove to d.c. from detroit for this week's commemoration and she brought her granddaughters with her. >> i wanted my granddaughters to see what i saw 50 years ago. to stand up for what's right. >> reporter: the struggles then and those to come draw john lewis back as well. you still come here often. >> oh, yes. >> reporter: why? >> because i come here to reflect, to remember. >> reporter: remembering his old friend, and the day that both made history and changed it. >> this spot is almost sacred. dr. king must be looked upon as one of the founding fathers of the new america. lewis believes america has come far in 50 years. many issues still exist. progress, he says, just a down payment on the dream. what was at stake that day? >> the future of america as one nation. as one people. it was at stake. he helped hold us together. >> reporter: is there one moment from that day that sticks out in your mind most? >> he started saying let freedom ring. let freedom ring. from stone mountain of georgia, let freedom ring. from every mol
are bailed out. detroit is in bankruptcy. we're paying an awful price for the intervention in iraq. said it leads to a moral and spiritual bankruptcy. when he was killed, the values and standards went up. of theeaming constitutional right to vote. keep dreaming about the war on poverty. choose schools over gills. keep dreaming of student loan forgiveness. keep dreaming. to restoreng foreclosed housing. keep dreaming of immigration reform that includes africa, haiti, and the caribbean. keep dreaming. we're free but not equal. keep dreaming. choose life over death. graduations and los feliz. keep the faith. keep hope alive though. -- keep hope alive. the lord is our life. >> ♪ >> our next speaker is is an attorney, president of the national bar association, president of the washington bar christiann, and the product company. >> we must stand an hour ground for justice. we must stand our ground for justice. on behalf of the national bar association, the nation's oldest and largest bar association of attorneys of color, founded in 1925, i am honored to be here today. for the last 88 years,
and extracted that phrase and first used it in the detroit speech and then the speech in washington. >> i think one of the things to remember about dr. king, he was always operating on multiple levels in the context of the speech. he had just visited the university of virginia, only about three months before the march on washington 15 years ago where he was given a very academic speech and really spoke from the professor voice and academic voice about philosophy. remember, the university of virginia is mr. jefferson's university. it is the president, the founder who wrote that bad check, who wrote of course that extraordinary founding document that said we take it as self evident that all people are created equal and endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights and if if there was any self evidence on the mountain in 1776 than the fundamental human equality and so we see in king drawing on his ak sem i can self and a moment of african-american american woman dom preacher dom and the great historic document. >> we talk about the historic speeches and you can see tens of thousands get
mother understood that we lived in the north in detroit michigan, where i live now. she and i knew, from reading different obligations, like jet , about newspaper different disturbances in the south. remember seeing the picture of major adverse, after he had been killed -- medger evers after he had been killed. i went to integrated schools and lived in a integrated neighborhood. my friends were white and black, all through school. it disturbs my mother and me that people in the south had problems and could not live the life that i lived. they went to lunch counters and took public transportation. we would get on the bus. ride wherever we need to go and sat wherever we want to set. -- sit. coming to the march meant supporting the travesties that were happening in the south. just my mother and i. 250,000 people felt the same way. many who watched from their tvs and homes. it felt the same way and could not get there. thatew and understood america is a democracy and they're supposed to be freedom. there is not freedom. we have to unite and stand together as a child, i was 12 .ears old you c
detroit, michigan, which is where i live now, but she knew and i knew from reading different publications like "jet." our black newspaper was then called "the michigan chronicle." i remember vividly seeing the picture of mr. evers after he had been killed. but growing up in the north, in detroit, i lived the dream that dr. king spoke of. i went to integrated schools. i lived in an integrated neighborhood. my friends were both white and black, all through school. it disturbed my mother and it disturbs me that people in the south had problems, they could not live the life that i lived. we dined at lunch counters and took public transportation in contrast to what you heard about rosa parks and others. we rode on the bus -- it was called the dsr then. and we would ride wherever we wanted to go and sit wherever we wanted to sit. coming to the march for us meant supporting the travesties that were happening in the south. and not just my mother and i, obviously. 250,000 people felt the same way. those that could get there. there were many who watched from their tv's at home that felt the same wa
momentarily. i am from detroit. i lost my parents at an early age. brother.raise a i was able to go to school and i graduated out of high school at 16. i was able to get an associates degree. i found work at a hospital. our kids need be education. month.be 54 next i have been sick all my life. my family came from tennessee. they always fought. >> vivian, what stood out today? what speech or comment? >> what did you say? >> diane black, ok? i am black, ok? they did not want us to take welfare. they taught us to be independent. you calling ine and sharing your story. to facebook, you can see a lot of the video on facebook. here is a comment. w bush and george w. bush declined to participate because they have health issues. george w. bush did release a statement earlier today that read -- the statement from former president george w. bush, who recently had some heart treatment. let's go to mississippi. laura from ocean springs, mississippi. i am 45 years old. when barack obama talked about education. they discussed how blacks and whites could not go to the same school. thes a graduate from unive
, the epa, the irs, the justice department to go on and on and on. it's like they want us to be detroit. we didn't vote for him. he got no votes from the state, thank you, oklahoma. but we are paying for it. and he doesn't end run around everybody. what can we do to get oklahomans working, to get these things implemented without him sitting up there and saying, this is what you're going to do, instead of the people that own this country telling them? [applause] >> you know, i would kill you don't blame it all on obama because they were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. i expense them, and he did, too. he goes back to the thing we kind of started out with, is the federal government is out of control. but it's been predicted by all the historians that our republic will fail. so the question is how do we cheat history? how do we go back? how do we really base -- we embrace the things that made america great. as i said earlier i think we have to get in charge. i've been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference, not a bi big difference. b
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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